Could Our Questions Revolutionize Life Within Us?

by Mark Votava

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“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest…” (Matthew 11:28).

  •  Christ calls out to us in our questions

Our union with Christ is embodied in our questions.  Our union with Christ is alive in our bodies when we practice reflection and rest.  It is our questions that speak of this union with Christ in our local context.  Christ calls out to us into our questions.

  •  Listening and learning from our reflection and rest

Christ calls out to us in our reflection and rest.  Christ is calling us to listen and learn from our reflection and rest.  Christ will give us a rest in our souls.  Christ will heal our unrestful and unreflective lives if we take on a posture of openness to our questions.

  •  Living inside of our questions

It is revolutionary and innovative to live inside of the questions that create new life from within.  We must not fear our questions anymore.  Our questions could liberate us from the status quo.

  •  Bringing us back to authenticity

Our questions could bring us back to authenticity.  Our questions could make us human again.  Our questions could help shape us from within.

  •  Our questions bring us together

Answers often times keep us from sharing life together.  It is our questions that bring us together as the body of Christ in the parish.  Our reflection and rest cultivate our questions.

  •  Answers ignore a listening posture in everyday life

We embody our questions together.  We embody our questions as a way of life in our local community.  Answers destroy our trust in the divine mysteries within and around us.  Answers ignore a listening posture in everyday life.

  •  Answers tend to dismiss others

Answers tend to dismiss others in our relational context.  We don’t need questions when we have answers.  We don’t need one another when we have answers.  We don’t need reflection and rest when we have answers.

  •  Maybe we don’t know as much as we think we do

Answers are misleading.  Answers are a lot of time an illusion.  We think we know a lot with answers, but maybe we don’t know as much as we think we do.

  •  Answers make trust and listening unnecessary

Richard Rohr says, “Answers make trust unnecessary, they make listening dispensable, they make relations with others superfluous.  Having my answers, I don’t need you in order to take my journey.  I need only my head, my certainties, and my conclusions.  It’s all private.  But Jesus said we have to live in this world so as to be dependent on one another…”

  •  Our questions promote a need for one another

Our questions promote a need for one another.  Our questions show us our need for a local context to inhabit together.  Our questions help us to see clearer.  Our questions lead us to a practice of reflection and rest.

What is one thing you do that helps you to live into your questions?

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